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Blarghour

Blarghour is a hill farm of 2,000 acres where our family has been fortunate to live since 1938. We are blessed with a wonderful open outlook over Loch Awe, fabulous sunsets and the mild climate that comes with living in Argyll in the West Highlands of Scotland.


The Farm

The farm is home to traditional scottish blackface sheep, cross ewes and luing cattle.  The luing cows are a breed which evolved from a beef shorthorn/highland cross on the small island of Luing, near Oban.

The Cottages

Two shepherd’s cottages and the old barn & stable have been converted to provide the comfortable self-catering accommodation we offer today.


History

Up until the late 1800’s three tenant families would have farmed Blarghour under the runrig system and the ruined settlements at Blarghour and Barr-beithe are still evident today.

Kilmartin Glen is famous for its Neolithic chambered cairns and you can also find one in the forest next to the farm.

Loch Awe has many Crannogs which were island dwellings where people and cattle sought some protection in days gone by, and some are still visible today.


Wildlife

Wild Geese

  • Red squirrels
  • red deer
  • roe deer
  • otter
  • pine marten
  • grouse
  • dippers
  • woodpecker
  • osprey
  • swallows (summer)
  • woodcock (winter)

Renewable Energy

Renewable Energy

Two small hydro-electricity schemes fed by the waters of Allt Blarghour produce electricity which is fed into the grid.

Two small wind turbines provide electricity to the farmhouse and one other house on the farm.

Green Tourism

Green Tourism

We have a Silver Award from Green Tourism which encourages us to think a little more about the steps we can take to a more sustainable life and minimise the impact of our activities on the environment.  A work in progress, but the Green Tourism at Blarghour summary gives an idea of what we are trying to achieve.


Waterfalls

Waterfalls

  • Falls on Allt Beochlich by the roadside at Barr-beithe
  • Blarghour Falls at 90ft are the third highest in Scotland, but not so easy to get to.
  • The Wee Waterfall on Allt Blarghour – follow the path from the hydro-electric turbine house

Loch Awe & Fishing

Loch Awe & Fishing

Loch Awe, at 25 miles long, is Scotland’s longest fresh water loch and visitors are welcome to walk to the shore and for those who wish to fish, permits are available at the farm.

Walks

Walks

Visitors are welcome to explore the farm:

  • to the shores of Loch Awe
  • to the ‘wee’ waterfall
  • to An Sidhean viewpoint (enchanted view) which rewards with a wonderful view, the sound of the sky lark and possible sightings of red deer
  • a circular route on the nearby forest track returning over the farm
  • an old minor drove road will take you past the ruined settlements of days gone by at Barr-beithe and Blarghour